What You Need to Know About

YOUR MEDICINES


Why should I take medicine after I’m feeling better?

Medicines are prescribed by your doctor to keep you healthy and prevent other health conditions from occurring. Not taking your medicine as prescribed can lead to illness, hospitalization and possibly death. This is why it is important to take your medicine, even if you feel you no longer need it. Never take any medications that aren’t prescribed to you and do not share your prescribed medication with others.

Always talk to your doctor before you stop taking any medicine.

What should I ask my doctor?

  • Are there any medicines or food I should avoid?
  • How often should I take it?
  • What time of the day should I take it?
  • What should I do if I forget?
  • Should I take with food or on an empty stomach?
  • How about interactions with common over-the-counter medicines?
  • How will I know my medicine is working?
  • Is there a generic or alternative available?

Do you take these?

Ask your doctor if you have:

Antacids
Kidney disease
Milk allergy
 
Antiemetics
Breathing problems
Enlarged prostate
Glaucoma
Nasal decongestants
Enlarged prostate
Heart disease
Thyroid disease
 
Diabetes
High blood pressure
 
Cough medicine
Glaucoma
 
 
Antihistimines
Breathing problems
Glaucoma
 
 
A prescription for depression or high blood pressure medications
 
Alcoholic beverages
 
 
*SOURCE: Food and Drug Administration. "Drug Interactions:What You Should Know."
https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resources-you-drugs/drug-interactions-what-you-should-know Retrieved April 15, 2014.

Do you take these?

Antacids

Ask your doctor if you have:

  • Kidney disease
  • Milk allergy

Antiemetics
(drugs often prescribed for nausea, vomiting or dizziness)

Ask your doctor if you have:

  • Breathing problems
  • Enlarged prostate
  • Glaucoma

Nasal decongestants

Ask your doctor if you have:

  • Enlarged prostate
  • Heart disease
  • ThThyroid disease
  • DiaDiabetes
  • High blood pressure

Cough medicine

Ask your doctor if you have:

  • Glaucoma

Antihistimines

Ask your doctor if you have:

  • Breathing problems
  • Glaucoma
  • A prescription for depression or high blood pressure medications
  • Alcoholic beverages
*SOURCE: Food and Drug Administration. "Drug Interactions:What You Should Know."
https://www.fda.gov/drugs/resources-you-drugs/drug-interactions-what-you-should-know Retrieved April 15, 2014.

How can I be sure to remember to take my medicines?

  • Develop a routine and take your medicine at the same time as another regular activity, such as brushing your teeth, drinking coffee or eating a meal.
  • Use a pillbox that has compartments for the pills you should take each day at a specific time.
  • Set your alarm clock or timer as a reminder.
  • Keep a calendar with your medicine schedule and make a note when you take each dose.
  • Color-code your medicine bottles with stickers. Use different colors for different times of the day.

For additional tips and medication information, download the myRX Planner mobile app.